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Author Topic: Sweet Potato Lefse  (Read 21557 times)
LaniR304
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« on: August 10, 2009, 02:24:54 am »

Someone told me about sweet potato lefse.  Sounded interesting.  Anyone have a recipe or anything?  Or would it be the same recipe as regular potato lefse? 
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randijb
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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2009, 07:36:24 am »

It is the regular potato lefse - you just put butter and sugar (and cinamon if you like it) on the lefse and serve is a cake/cookie with coffee/tea.  You can also make a sweet buttercream.  My mother use to serve it every now and then with our afternoon coffee - yummi Grin
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Taryn
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2009, 11:59:52 pm »

Even though sweet potatoes originated in the tropics of the Americas, and it certainly wouldn't be a Norwegian ingredient, with the emphasis on healthier carbs, it's an intriguing idea!
The higher sugar content of sweet potatoes would cause them to burn easily on the griddle, wouldn't you think?

Check out this website:

http://kafehus.net/bakery.htm

Sweet Potato Lefse Made with a mixture of sweet and russet potatoes for a sweeter tasting lefse.  Lefse is vacuum packed and shipped the same day it is baked so it arrives as fresh as possible. Choose packages of 3, 6, 12 or 24 rounds. Each round is approximately 12-13".

Or this obituary:
http://obit.wiggenandsons.com/obitdisplay.html?id=669995

Always proud of her Norwegian heritage she would make the traditional lutefisk Christmas dinner with lefse and all the trimmings, but she would make roast beef for her non-lutefisk loving family members. Ruth was innovative in the kitchen and would try different recipes that 99.9% of the time were delicious. One year she made lefse with sweet potatoes and from then on she made sweet-potato lefse for us. If you like potato lefse, I can guarantee you will absolutely love sweet-potato lefse.
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Jews32
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« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2009, 05:42:27 am »

Instant Sweet Potato Lefse

Servings: 6
1 pk (7 oz) instant Sweet potatoes
2 ts Salt
1 tb Butter
1 c Rich milk
1 c Boiling water
1 1/2 c Flour

Place instant Sweet potato flakes, salt and butter in mixing bowl. Add boilig water to milk and add to potato mixture. Mix quickly until thick and smooth. Add just enough flour to be able to handle dough. Knead lightly.
Form into balls and roll very thin on floured board. Bake on hot electric lefse grill (any griddle will work), turning to brown both sides.


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« Last Edit: December 21, 2009, 07:06:02 am by Jews32 » Logged
Taryn
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« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2009, 08:44:45 am »

Sounds great!  Where can you find instant sweet potatoes? 
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dougandconnie
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2012, 11:46:00 am »

My wife grew up in the Central Valley of California.  Her great Grandparents were among a group of Norwegian-Americans that moved there from Hoffman, Minnesota in the early 1900's.  Unfortunately, this entire group was taken advantage of, by unscrupulous land agents, who sowed rough, sandy, uneven patches of very poor quality farmland with a lush, fast growing cover crop, that made the land look very bountiful.  When the cover crop died down in the heat and dryness of the hot Central Valley early summer, they realized what they had been sold.  They worked the land for several years to make it even and tillable.  They also had to go to great expense to put in irrigation.  Eventually the land was made productive, and thanks to their efforts, became highly valuable tracts of farmland.  During this time the families had very little money, little to eat, and basic survival was of paramount importance.  There were large sweet potato farms already established in the better tracts of land in the area.  According to my wife's grandmother, the children were sent out daily with pails, to the piles of the unsalable, cull sweet potatoes, to gather food for the families.  At this time, many of the housewives made their daily lefse out of these sweet potatoes.  This was not a fancy culinary or diet fad, but rather necessity to survive.  Today, many families in the Turlock-Stevinson-Hillmar areas in the Central Valley still make their holiday Lefse from Sweet potatoes.  Butter and jam or marmelade is the traditional topping or filling. (yes, Lutefisk, and boiled white potatoes are still part of the meal, but Sweet potato lefse id traditional.)  The question was asked about them burning easier,  Surprisingly enoughj, they cook the same as a regular lefse.  However, the dough is stickier to work with and require a  bit more flour.
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