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Author Topic: Rosemaling examples  (Read 8940 times)
Taryn
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« on: January 17, 2009, 11:42:12 am »

Skogfjorden Language Village, near Bemidji, has a "Norwegian Village" with opportunities for summer camps and weekends where kids, adults, famililes can study Norwegian.  They have some nice examples of Norwegian art and architecture to add to the feel of being in Norway.

Bergljot Lunde was commissioned when some of the camp was developed, to do some decorative Rosemaling there.   Now I believe she may be in her 80's and living in Norway. 

Here are some door panels she painted. 

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ole
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2009, 11:56:31 am »

Hi Trayn, so you have been to Skogfjoreden before.  It's a good place.  Our Sons of Norway lodge has our Syttende Mai celebration there every year.  I also go to an adult Norwegian weekend held the end of April every year.  This will be my 5th year.  The ceiling of Gimli, where the door panels are, is also rosemaled.  It was done by a man from Norway, who did it lying on his back on a scaffold.  I can't think of his name off hand but it is also beautiful work.  In the pattern, at various points, are five faces that you can try to find and is quite fun to see people try to find them when you tell them that.  I have been there enough times that I have them figured out.  I believe it is done in the Telemark style.
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Taryn
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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2009, 01:19:19 pm »

I have been wracking my brain all morning, to remember the name of the guy who did the ceiling at Skogfjorden, it will come to me later, I know it. 
He also did the ceiling at Trollhaugen ski resort upstairs, which is in Dresser, Wisconsin, right at the border of Minnesota and Wisconsin.  If you think if his name, let me know.  It's driving me crazy.  I learned Rosemaling from Helen Elizabeth Blanck back in the early 1980's, who had taken classes from both of them at Decorah, Iowa, among other guest folk artists who came there to teach.  Helen really emphasized to us that Rosemaling was a folk art, not a fine art, and that the overbrushed, perfectly detailed examples that can be found in the upper midwest are not really true to the folk art roots, but an American creation.  I liked the folk art theory best, because one can look at it and think, "Maybe I could try that."  The perfect specimens are fantastic, but beyond a lot of people's reach to acquire those skills.

Even Wikipedia credits Per Lysne as being the "father of American Rosemaling".  He was an immigrant who worked as a wagon painter in Wisconsin, and at that time, wagons also were detailed with flourishes and some pinstriping types of decoration, etc.  Not just painted red.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemaling

Here is a website from the Wisconsin Historical society with a photo of Per Lysne, and a plate of his on their website:
http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/museum/exhibits/p2p/red/rosemaling.asp

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Taryn
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2009, 01:23:00 pm »

Concordia Language villages also has Rosemaling workshops.

Here's the link:
http://www.concordialanguagevillages.org/newsite/About/Staff/rosemaling_staff.php


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Taryn
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2009, 01:28:17 pm »

Here is an example of an American rosemaler named Nancy Schmidt.  It's fantastic.  And an interesting contrast to how American rosemaling began as compared to Per Lysne's piece.

http://www.scandinavianhjemkomstfestival.org/media/gudbrandsdalenSHF07.jpg

Here's a thumbnail, but you should really open the link to see the full size to appreciate the fine blending and detail work with the liner and teardrop brushes.



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Taryn
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« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2009, 01:34:11 pm »

I remembered!  Sigmund Aarseth is the painter who rosemaled ceilings at Skogfjorden near Bemidji and Trollhaugen in Dresser, Wisconsin.  The transparent Telemark style lent itself well to the sweeping brush strokes on that large scale.

Here is a book by Sigmund Aarseth that I found at Amazon.com by Gudmund Aarseth.



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ole
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2009, 02:27:50 pm »

I'm glad you remebered Sigmund's name, because I was still trying to remember.  I took a rosemaling class quite a few years ago here at a community ed. class.  The lady that taught it, Mary Mortonson, had done a demonstration at our lodge in Bemidji and I had asked if she would come up to Northome and teach a class, which she did.  So I learned the Rogaland style.  I haven't done a lot lately, but want to get back into it more.  Here is a plate that I did for a friend's wedding.
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Taryn
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« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2009, 11:24:58 pm »

It's great that you studied Rosemaling.  Do you use oils?  That's what I use, when I have a chance to paint. 
My Rosemaling hobby coincided with my dad's retirement from the post office, and he had a nice heated woodworking shop where he was always making things for me to paint.  He wanted me to paint his trunk that he made during the Depression, from a "scrounged" dynamite box that he had gotten from a construction site, and had used for his shop class project, because he had no money for materials.  (Lots of things he had saved over the years had a story.)  At that time I used a pattern that was in a Helen Blanck design folio, it seemed to fit.  Now I'm sure I'd add more borders, maybe tone it down a bit.  But he was happy to have it painted that many years after he'd fixed it up.
Behind the trunk is a box that he invented to put his Shriners Fez into, so that it wouldn't get crushed.  It was an odd shaped box, and he wanted it painted too.  He also made Tine boxes, using thin plywood "scrounged" (his favorite word) from the scrap heap at the local Bellanca airplane factory.  It bent easily. 

« Last Edit: January 17, 2009, 11:28:24 pm by Taryn » Logged
ole
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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2009, 12:40:02 pm »

Yes I do use oils and your pictures are great.  Nice job!  I must be of the same mold when it comes to wood working.  Most of the things I've ever made, including my sauna, have been from "scrounged" woods.  I've told people that I'm not sure what I'd do with a new piece of wood.  I'd be scared of wrecking it I think.  I think part of that comes from being a maintenance person for so long at the school, having to work with what you could scrounge up because a certain part or whatnot wasn't in the budget.  When I was a kid I also worked with what there was laying around the farm or in the woods to use for one of my "projects".  I've also wanted to make some tine boxes, I have a book, but haven't got around to trying.  One of these days!
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Erik (admin)
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2009, 05:07:27 pm »

How do you do it. This is great work! When I am trying to draw something, it looks like I still am in 2nd grade..  Cheesy
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